Artwork

My artwork touches on themes of interpretation, pain, and loss in relation to the digital. The work takes many different forms, from games and purely digital reproductions to prints to sculpture. The work is often an attempt to grapple with the seemingly disjunctive nature of the digital and physical worlds, and to examine what happens when they are blended together. I am currently pursuing my MFA in digital art and design from Parsons School of Design.

  • Below
  • Below

    "Below" is a series of stills created from a pure GLSL program written to mimic water at dusk.

  • Your Trash Is You
  • Your Trash Is You

    "Trash Issue" is a series of stills created by using digital trash as the raw material to construct recombinant images, and then using machine learning to describe those images. Over the course of a few months I saved the bytes from all of the screen shots I threw away on my computer. I then created new images from these bytes through a process similar to digital deletion, where I overwrote bytes of one image with random bytes from all the other deleted images. The resulting images were extremely broken: I would open them five different times and be shown five different images. Blocks of color would be shifted, moved around, changed. However, using a machine learning algorithm to provide descriptions of the images would return a consistent output every time, regardless of the display of the image. The images above are examples of the results of this process, in this case they are all a file that was labelled as "a television screen with a picture of a cat on it." The work is about the aesthetic and informational potential of digital waste within the context of the shifting nature of visual culture.

  • Unintended Processes
  • Unintended Processes

    "Fractures" is a series of images glitched by applying sorting algorithms to the pixel data of screenshots. The sorting process is paused periodically and a screenshot of the partially sorted image is taken. The series explores the relationship between algorithms and data, and the application of algorithms to data they weren't meant to manipulate.

  • Places
  • Places

    "Places" is a game about constructed landscapes, place, and loss. The game starts as a flat plane with an icosahedron floating above it. Once you walk within a certain distance of the icosahedron it prompts you to open a dialogue, which is a stanza from a poem. To progress through the poem(s) you are prompted to quit the game and return later. Every time you reopen the game the landscape is generated from all previous actions you took every past time you played the game. In this way, you are unconsciously building the environment that you'll later experience. The poems are One Art by Elizabeth Bishop, Images of Little Compton, Rhode Islance by James Tate, and Neptune by Arda Collins. Through these poems the player follows a thread of loss, questioning, and acceptance.